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20130113
20130113
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
or the largest economy in the world. we need to get to the point of dealing with the biggest deficit in the country, the jobs deficit. to me, this bill simply put a band-aid on the problem. it did do something the president wanted to do, committed to do. he delivered on the promise to try to help protect the middle- class class. my theory is that in the next three political maneuvers that we are going to see coming up in congress, that people will start attacking the middle class. i believe this was our best opportunity to really take care long-term of the issues that we need to address to a balanced approach. >> to follow-up on that, you you voted early. you are not just waiting to see if it was going to pass and then vote no. the idea that obama kind of thatsome leverage theire, you wanted to see him fail, that he has to go back to the leverage -- that he does not have the leverage -- >> after the republicans walked away from the negotiations and tried the plan b by speaker boehner, it became clear, even after they tried to amend the senate yield that they could not do so dosh and
the opposite. record increases in spending, the biggest peacetime deficit in history, no effort to address entitlements which have grown significantly more challenging. wouldn't you call this that anti-clinton budget? >> no, i'm very proud of the work i did in the clinton administration and i point out one of the reasons spending was falling as a percentage of gdp was the economy was growing so fast because we had a good fiscal policy that promoted competent and economic growth. if you look at the projections today, we are projecting the retirement of the baby boom and we see more people claiming their benefits. >> i want to get to that projection. it is part of the reality that even if we cut spending in the policies we are making, as we pay the policies that are due, there are areas where spending goes up. i don't think any of us want to be saying people should not be able to collect social security benefits when they are 65. that and medicare for people who are retiring are driving aggregate spending levels. on the discretionary side, we are cutting spending. >> which is why we are baff
presided over three budget surpluses in a row. so for all the talk out there about deficit reduction, making sure our books are balanced, this is the guy who did it. three times. >> the white house chief of staff, jack lew, was nominated by the president this week to replace outgoing treasury secretary timothy geithner. lew is a democratic veteran of washington, 30 years of service. currently he is president obama's chief of staff. earlier lew served as his budget director, and in that job he raised republican hackles. in fact, jeff sessions of alabama, the ranking republican on the senate budget committee, has already said he will try to block mr. lew's confirmation, notably over a statement lew made two years ago. lew was then omb, office of management and budget director. "our budget will get us over the next several years to the point where we can look the american people in the money th speaking to this, senator sessions had this to say. "to look the american people in the eye and make such a statement remains the most direct and important false assertion during ng my entire t i
to reduce our deficit through a balanced mix of spending cuts and reforms to a tax code that at the time when we both came in was skewed in favor of the wealthy at the expense of middle class americans. when the history books are written, tim geithner is going to go down as one of our finest secretaries of the treasury. [applause] don't embarrass him. [laughter] on a personal note, he has been a wonderful friend and dependable advisor the out these last four years. there is an unofficial thing at treasury -- no peacocks commager, no winners. that would be a good saying for all of washington. few embody that ideal better than tim geithner. that is why when he was thinking about leaving a couple of years ago, i had to personally get on my knees with carol to help convince him to stay on a little bit longer. i could not be more grateful to carol and the entire family for letting him make
mean for some crops. >>> and can california's deficit really become a budget surplus? we are going to talk with state senator jerry hill live in studio about what seems to be a budget miracle. >>> we have temperatures mostly in the 20s this morning in the inland valleys. freeze warnings posted but nevertheless we've got sun out there and a beautiful sunrise on the way for your sunday morning. we will have the forecast. first we will take a break. citrus growers in the south save their crops. >>> well, the cold weather plaguing california has citrus growers in the south scrambling to save their crops. >> that's right. and one kern county orchard they couldn't pick the oranges fast enough. one grower harvested only about 1/3 of his oranges before the temperatures plunged. his grove is a small part of call's -- california's $2 billion citrus economic but also an economic reality at work here. if the freeze destroys his crops he won't be able to employ workers. >>> it is freezing for sure. we are even looking at possible record breaking lows? what
deficit of california? >> yes. he's paying back some of the debt. we had 27 billion that was used and borrowed from special funds and he's paying that back slowly. by 2016, that is down from 4 billion. k through 12 education and they would do that trick and pay it in july where they owed them in june and that is here, about $2 billion. >> and that is what that were sold on when they raised taxes, the idea of more money going toec. does it fulfill the promise? >> it provides $2.7 billion more to education and 500 million to higher education and that is where a lot of the support is and the governor made a contract. i think he has a contract with the voters and is willing to live up to that and ask for more resources and money and taxes. he got that and is not going to be responsible moving forward. >> and when we pass prop 30, it wasdoms day. we were going to see draconian cuts and now a surplus? did that solve the problem? >> the question is, were they telling the truth then? >> is that crying wolf then? >> it's not. this budget has $6 billion from the tax increase and without tha
is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the state tax that governor gindale wants to add. no one will be able to afford it or go shopping. >> steve, this is a country of experiment ground . the states experiment with things that might do better. >> there are 9 states who don't have a personal income tax. you compare the state of vermont with the state of new hampshire. new hampshire has no sales tax or personal income tax and does better over time than the neighboring st
in that regard, and they haven't experience environmental problems. and with new york's budget deficit, it seems obvious that hydrofracking is the way to go. and, of course, governor cuomo is free to set whatever regulations he wants about that to ensure the safety of quality and other things that residents are concerned about. i would say that the project should proceed. it's brought benefit to other states. there's no reason that new york should be left behind. >> okay. right in front. wait for the mic a fun. >> you get very good examples of unsuccessful creations of new green jobs. had also looked at elimination of existing jobs like really good cost-benefit analysis done for regulations? >> the cost-benefit analysis for mercury was a travesty. if you look at the cost-benefit analysis carefully, all the benefits from reducing mercury came from getting rid of particulates and particulates were not the focus of that particular regulation. and what was interesting is the benefits focus on additional days of school. in other words, a few days of schools miss, two days of work missed because of lo
. >> reporter: the president is gearing up for fights on gun control, deficit reduction, with likely deep defense budget cuts and immigration reform. on tuesday, we will know whether the vice-president will recommend an assault weapons ban. most doubt he will go that far and will look for stronger background checks. on immigration, the president looks likely to get more bipartisan support, with republicans, such as senator marco rubio, presenting similar measures to create a path to citizenship for the current 12 million illegal americans. >> thank you very much. senator lindsay graham isn en route to our studio. i will ask him about gun control and the debate and the cabinet recommendations. send us your questions for senator graham. we will ask him some of your questions. that live interview is in our next hour. in congressional democrats believe it does matter when it comes to the 14th amendment and the debt. listen to this. >> i can say that this administration does not believe that the 14th amendment gives the president the power to ignore the debt ceiling. >> shannon: all right sm.
by the end of his first term he would cut the deficit in half. yet he still has not put a single credible plan on the table on how to deal with the debt crisis. >> i'm sorry, martha. martha, with all due respect, thiss
in a night of revelry in paris. it seems, he writes in his memoir, a deficit of trust existed between him and the president's men. a former black operations specialist, the general is very slick on the book circuit, blocking and passing adroitly when the questions get into the weeds. his political outlook is liberal, having admittedly voted for obama in 2008. he speaks the language of the left, eshoeing any queries about his dealings with president obama and preferring to emphasize soft power and what he calls his ballistic relationship with people. if the reader is look for an spraipgz of how he was ambushed by rolling stone, the general is mostly mute. a commander naive enough to think a reporter who hears thinks doesn't make them public. he actually said he was surprised by the tone and direction of the article. what is astounding, with all the money and manpower that the pentagon has spent on media relations, all the military strategizing, nobody seems to have gained much sophistication if in dealing with the press since the war on vietnam. he sprinkles the book with great warriors an
a deficit and debt point of view. so there's much more resistance on the republican side than there used to be. to all of the little riders and pieces of pork that are loaded into these disaster relief bills. and that's some of the changes we've seen in terms of these things being held up. an easy way to do this, and it's hard to get an agreement on this in the senate-s just to pass a clean disaster relief bill with nobody else's projects in there. having said that, republicans need to be careful. there are a number of republican house seats in new jersey and new york that could be threatened if republicans are perceived as holding up aid to sandy. and it's just not anywhere they really want to be when they're trying to focus on a debt ceiling fight or at least they should be. and i think from a political point of view and even substantively they have much bigger -- they have much bigger things to go after and try and accomplish than being perceived as callous when you have so many people in the northeast that don't have functional homes in the dead of winter. >> quickly changing topics,
the venezuelan economy. the economy is, frankly, in shambles. barclay's puts fiscal deficit at nearly 20% of gdp, one of the highest imbalances in the world. total debt has more than doubled since 2008. and that is despite the fact that venezuela has the greatest proven reserves of oil in the world. more than saudi arabia, iran or canada. when hugo chavez first came to power in 1999, oil was trading at $11 a barrel. today, it is trading at $111 a barrel. chavez has presided over the greatest windfall in his country's history. and, yet, venezuela is probably the only petro state in the world where people regularly suffer power outages. infrastructure is crumbling and public security is abysmal. venezuela has one of the worst homicide rates in the world, worse even than colombia, honduras and mexico. venezuelan exports to the u.s. from the start of chavez's rule through 2011 added up to nearly $350 billion. that's iconic for a presidency which marketed itself as anti-american. but even that trend may be reversing. according to a "financial times" report for every 10 barrels of crude that are expor
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)